Ophthalmology

 

Welcome,

As a major ophthalmic teaching center on Long Island, Nassau University Medical Center’s Department of Ophthalmology offers outstanding, fully accredited residency training opportunities.

Our residents come from across the country to embark on an intensive three-year educational experience, with each level of training building on the knowledge base of the year before.  At this bustling Level 1 Trauma Center, we service over 16,000 patients annually through our Eye Center, seeing everything from routine exams to rare and advanced pathology.  There is a great camaraderie between our residents, who truly become part of our ophthalmology family and enjoy life on Long Island.

Our growing team of fellowship-trained faculty is highly regarded for their depth of knowledge and skill, but they are best known for their approachability and commitment to patient care and teaching.  They represent the full spectrum of ophthalmic subspecialties, with fields of expertise including cataract, anterior segment, and refractive surgery, glaucoma, vitreoretinal surgery, oculoplastics, neuro-ophthalmology, uveitis, pediatric ophthalmology, and ophthalmic pathology.

Our patients, like our residents, come from across the Island, the state, and the world.  Located in the center of the populous and affluent Nassau County, we serve patients from a vast array of diverse backgrounds, ranging from life-long Long Islanders to recent immigrants.  A large portion of our patient population base comes from underserved countries in the Caribbean, Central America, and elsewhere, and our residents have the honor of the opportunity to serve, positively impacting our patients’ health and vision.  We pride ourselves in caring for all patients, regardless of their ability to pay.

After completing training at our program, our graduates command the necessary skills and knowledge to be distinguished comprehensive ophthalmologists.  The majority of our graduates pursue fellowship training in a wide range of subspecialties, but those that choose comprehensive ophthalmology are unparalleled in their excellent performance.  The opportunities for our graduates are endless.

We look forward to welcoming you.

 

Marcelle M. Morcos, MD, FACS
Chair, Department of Ophthalmology
Residency Program Director

Program Description

The Department of Ophthalmology has been continuously accredited since it was founded in 1967.  We train excellent comprehensive ophthalmologists and prepare residents for the American Board of Ophthalmology certification and for competitive fellowships in their field of choice.

We are committed to attracting exceptional students and retaining outstanding faculty who provide superlative patient care as well as clinical and didactic training for medical students, resident physicians, and post-residency fellows in ophthalmology.  Additionally, the Department promotes continuing medical education for practicing ophthalmologists through courses, conferences, and the annual Resident Research Day.

Comprehensive ophthalmologic care is provided through the clinic daily in the Eye Center.  Subspecialty clinics are generally held in the afternoons weekly.  Ophthalmic emergency care provided by our department around the clock.

We take pride in our commitment to the care of all patients from our county, neighboring counties, and around the world, regardless of their ability to pay.

 

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2015 GRADUATION CELEBRATION

 

CURRICULUM OVERVIEW

FIRST YEAR The first year of our Ophthalmology Residency Program emphasizes the art and science of the ophthalmic exam, including diagnostic clinical skills and patient management.  Our resident is the patient’s primary ophthalmic care provider, and emphasis is placed on continuity of care.

Residents receive early exposure to surgical techniques.  Our program has a dedicated wet lab where residents can practice skills and prepare for procedures at any time.  As the first years gain proficiency, they are introduced to the operating room with a variety of extraocular procedures as well as common laser procedures.

All residents attend weekly didactic sessions, where basic science topics and case reports are discussed under attending supervision.  Didactic education is supplemented by American Academy of Ophthalmology curriculum and learning resources.

The first year residents attend a four-week basic science course in January at the Columbia Harkness Eye Institute, a course that offers a unique professional development opportunity with both didactic lectures and hands-on workshops.  The course is delivered by more than 80 clinicians and scientists who are chosen for their expertise in their field.

SECOND YEAR Subsequent years of residency training build on the skills and aptitudes developed during the first year of ophthalmology residency.  Second year residents have more prominent roles in the subspecialty clinics as well as the opportunity to participate in all subspecialty surgeries, emphasis is placed on strabismus, oculoplastics, and more advanced laser surgeries.

Second year residents have a designated two-month surgical rotation at Columbia Harkness Eye Institute, in which residents participate in a wide variety of surgical procedures with Columbia’s attending surgeons.

The remaining time is spent at Nassau University Medical Center providing medical and surgical care to patients, expanding their knowledge and experience base, and providing guidance to junior residents and medical students.

THIRD YEAR In the third year of the residency program, residents achieve not only proficiency but mastery of ophthalmic diagnosis, management, and surgery.

Senior residents are the primary surgeon on all cases, including cataract extraction and lens implantation, corneal and endothelial transplants, glaucoma filtration and drainage device placement, as well as a vast array of vitreoretinal surgeries.  Residents learn the most advanced techniques of these major surgeries, and all cases are supervised by board-certified, subspecialty trained faculty.

Throughout the three years of our program, a natural mentorship develops between senior and junior residents. This relationship allows third year residents further hone their fund of knowledge and clinical acumen through their role as instructors, serving as an invaluable source of knowledge and skill for their junior residents.

At the culmination of the third year, senior residents are required to deliver a Grand Rounds presentation to all faculty and residents as an opportunity to explore a particular interest and gain advanced knowledge and expertise in their field of choice in ophthalmology.

OUR RESIDENTS

PGY-IV

Kevin Bubel, MD
University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas Southwestern Medical School, Dallas, TX

Jason Franklin, MD
Sidney Kimmel Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA

Kevin Garff, MD |
University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, UT

Gregory Kramer, MD
State University of New York Health Sciences Center at Stony Brook School of Medicine, Stony Brook, NY

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PGY-III

Kirkland Castellano, MD
New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY

Eileen Chang, MD
Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA

Lola Grillo, MD
Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY

Ryan Phan, MD
University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO

PGY-II

Tomilade Adepoju, MD
American University of the Caribbean School of Medicine, Sint Maarten

Max Chikovsky, MD
University of South Florida Morsani College of Medicine, Tampa, FL

Andrew Pansick, MD
University of Texas Southwestern Medical School, Dallas, TX

Alexander Shusko, MD
Creighton University School of Medicine, Omaha, N

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A FEW OF THE PLACES RECENT ALUMNI HAVE GONE FOR FELLOWSHIP…

CORNEA

  • Albany Medical College
  • Ophthalmic Consultants of Long Island
  • Pepose Vision Institute
  • University of Colorado School of Medicine

GLAUCOMA

  • University of Florida – Gainesville
  • University of South Florida

MEDICAL RETINA

  • Bascom Palmer Eye Institute
  • Boston Medical Center

 

NEURO-OPHTHALMOLOGY

  • Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary

OCULOPLASTIC SURGERY

  • Boston Medical Center
  • Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary

PATHOLOGY

  • Bascom Palmer Eye Institute

PEDIATRICS

  • Duke Ophthalmology
  • University of Pittsburgh Eye Center

UVEITIS

  • Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary

VITREO-RETINAL SURGERY

  • Columbia Harkness Eye Institute
  • Duke Ophthalmology
  • University of Pittsburgh Eye Center
  • Valley Retina Institute

Faculty

Comprehensive:
Dr. Marcelle Morcos
Dr. Alexander Hatsis
Dr. Caroline Alexander

Retina:
Dr. Robert Lopez
Dr. John Alexander

Glaucoma
Dr. Stanley Berke
Dr. Ronald Caronia
Dr. Richard Gotlib

Cornea:
Dr. Henry Perry
Dr. Eric Donnenfeld
Dr. Peter Maris, Jr.
Dr. Alexander Hatsis
Dr. John Pilavas

Pediatrics and ROP:
Dr. Maury Marmor
Dr. Eric Roberts
Dr. Richard Koty
Dr. Michelle Levi

Uveitis:
Dr. Raphael Rosenbaum

Neuro-Ophthalmology/Oculoplastics:
Dr. Nicholas Biro
Dr. David Schlessinger
Dr. Samuel Baharestani

Physical Optics:
Dr. Joel Weintraub, MD, JD

Medical Professional Ethics:
Dr. Joel Weintraub, MD, JD

Low Vision, Contact Lenses:
Dr. Joseph Hallak O.D., PhD

Contact Us

Department of Ophthalmology
Phone: (516) 572-6706 or (516) 572-6646
Fax: 516 572-9477

Application

Positions are filled yearly through the San Francisco Match Application System. Selected candidates will be invited for an interview around mid-November and mid-December. If you do not receive a request for an interview, it will indicate that you have not been selected for consideration for appointment to the program.